Ministry of Silly Steps

Posted by Marek Siwiec MEP on 25/01/13
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In the common language “a child, a person with special needs” reflects a permanent physical or mental disability. These words were used by Polish Minister of Foreign Affairs to describe the position of Great Britain in the European Union. He could have mentioned an illness, told about a possible treatment, claimed his readiness to help, but he didn’t. He preferred to be direct and, therefore, quoted in a number of twiitts. That was a big mistake though. 
Europe reacted critically for the Cameron’s speech, but everybody knows that it will still be doing businesses with him in one way or the other. Thus, why to insult the partner?
Radoslaw Sikorski is a man of the world. He has graduated from a British university. Indeed! He was identifying himself using the British ID card for many years. Hence, he should know what language shall be used on the Islands in order to be understood. There is even such a term – British humour – a thing that was actually missing in his speech.
So far, Minister Sikorski has been famous for his courageous bons mots, astonishing for the European capitals. A few years had passed until Russia and Germany swallowed a bitter pill of calling Nord Stream a new Ribbentrop – Molotov Pact. Later the jokes about electing president Obama and others spread around the world.
What adds spices to Sikorski´s statement is the fact that, he claimed Poland´s readiness to take the place left by the UK in the EU. Using the rhetoric of the Minister – not only did he announce the disability of the partner, but he is also eager to take his place…

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Marek Siwiec MEP on Poland & Europe rss

Marek Siwiec, Polish Member of the European Parliament, writes about European Neighbourhood Policy, defence policy, Polish Presidency of the EU Council, Polish politics and other topics related to European and international affairs. more.



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